John Andrews is a Competitive Webmaster and Search Engine Optimization Consultant in Seattle, Washington. This is John Andrews blog on issues of interest to the SEO community and competitive webmasters. Want to know more?

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Another Deleted Blog Post – Why blog on SEO?

Just wrote and deleted another 800 or so word blog post on SEO. I was compelled to write it, because I know that what I was reading on SEO on the Internet was incorrect, but no one seemed to notice. Writing it helped clarify the thoughts, and align them with potential execution steps that were fuzzy during the idea stage. As I wrote, I supported my assertions with rationale culled from my personal experience as an SEO, today, succeeding with Google optimization. I’m very busy, having fun, and working very hard. SEO works, but it’s not what a lot of people think it is. It’s not magic, but it’s also not a mystery.
When my post was good enough to publish, and just needed a read-through and some final editing, I deleted it. The bottom line is, why publish on SEO? If you have a good answer to that question, feel free to post a comment.

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15 Responses to “Another Deleted Blog Post – Why blog on SEO?”

  1. aaron wall Says:

    I wouldn’t delete it unless I were afraid of the blog getting hacked. At a minimum leaving it inside your admin area allows you to search against it later & see how some of your ideas came to be.

    Why are most posts published? Likely marketing & self-promotion. Beyond that, posts can have a variety of purposes…
    – attracting like-minded individuals to a community (I earned more from stuff I learned in our community than I made from any direct payments from it)
    – wanting to provide a counter-balance to the misinformed dodo junk that is flying around (imagine how much more extreme things would be if nobody dared to counter some moves by search engines…they were already full-on scraping & displacing original content sources with their very own thin info pages)
    – venting frustration
    – historical record (which can be used to point out trends & verify that you in advance had a good idea of where things might be headed)
    – and last, but (apparently) least, altruism ;)

  2. aaron wall Says:

    i also meant to add solidifying thoughts & theories to my list there…but forgot to include it since you said you were able to do that in that case without hitting publish…but it still helps on that front anyhow, even if it is not published ;)

  3. Ani Lopez Says:

    in my case I write about SEO just because I’m a open source, minded, knowledge lover

  4. Michael Martinez Says:

    Because I’ve come to respect your opinion and experience and would like to read more about what you have to say on the subject. I’m tired of reading the latest attempts to rehash the 3 basic linking strategies. I’m tired of looking at infographics. I’m tired of seeing people talk about other people’s stories. I’m tired of bounce rates, thin content, and how Panda has damned all civilization to hell.

    I’m interested in people’s opinions, based on their experience, about what is and isn’t right in the world today and why they care about what is and isn’t right.

  5. Rick Bucich Says:

    I for one am the curious type and have noticed a rapid acceleration in the evolution of SEO techniques in the last year. At the same time, old spammy techniques are still well entrenched. Would welcome any insight you might have.

  6. Hugo Says:

    One good reason I’ve found: it helps me win client deals.

  7. darren Says:

    there is 1 and only 1 answer in my opinion: you are looking to get clients or sell an SEO-related service. Which of course leads to mostly biased published advice…or a big hole of the types of things that should be published/said but won’t be.

  8. Michael Davidson Says:

    Isn’t it great that there is so much obviously wrong information out there. It would be terrible to have knowledgeable people like yourself challenge it and expose it for the fraud it is. I’m glad you don’t point out the wrongs in others. It keeps me employed as a search marketer when people have had no luck because they follow bad advice. They are convinced that it must be voodoo and we have some mystical knowledge only revealed to the worthy.

  9. Martin Oddy Says:

    Well you either want to draw attention to yourself and establish yourself as an authority or you do not. Your choice ;)

    If it’s any help, I think you’ve wrote some good stuff over the years and find your content quite refreshing.

  10. robert Says:

    Hmmph. Well since you’re in my feed reader, I would have liked to read something from you, for one. ;)

  11. Barry Welford Says:

    You’re right, John. I’ll use Google as a typical search engine but I’m sure the others have similar processes.

    Increasingly Google is ensuring that only websites that follow its guidelines have any chance of being visible in keyword searches. SEO that attempts to use some non-conforming gimicks will likely have a very short shelf-life. What counts in SEO is to ensure that you do not inadvertently create barriers to visibility either through site architecture or coding. Most of this is timeless advice so what is there to say that is new.

    You could of course write to correct the writings of others that are confused or just plain wrong. However what’s the percentage in that?

  12. Glenn Friesen Says:

    You stumped me for a while, John. Thanks for being thought-provoking.

    Why publish on SEO:
    – To provide proof you know a lot about the subject
    – To actually educate people about the process
    – To publish on something intellectually stimulating and interesting for an audience to read about — but less politically charged than, say, exposing the past decade of American wars as being founded and maintained on blatant lies in order to expand and preserve a global economic empire; or less personally exposing than something like a personal journal about your hopes, fears, dreams, and friends.

  13. Injury Compensation Claims Says:

    Hey Johnon,

    Why have you deleted it? Just because you thought as to why publish on SEO? John, there are reasons which I think for you should have posted.
    1. Posts on SEO will definitely get readers/webmasters and etc.
    2. Because of your post many reader like us could have learned something more about SEO as we all know that at least right now SEO has no end its path has variations, ways and methods new and old about which many are unaware.

    You should not think that your post is for gaining rankings, it actually makes those webmasters even to think who just shut off to expand over SEO.

    At least you should not have deleted, it would have been better if you would have just saved it and not published.

    Hope you understand.

  14. Paul Madden Says:

    A friend tweeted this, SEO is a skillset that people need to learn for themselves – following and reading others is pointless.

    Get a domain (or 50) and play – then when you know what works and what doesnt build real value for yourself and your family

    Screw SEO – Screw making other people money – Test, try and push

  15. Bob Says:

    I’m way late to the party on this, but I agree 100% with what Aaron said. I would add that being right (or accurate) is a virtue. Publishing knowledge isnt a bad thing as long as it doesnt work against you in a competitive manner. And with you, that shouldnt be a concern as no one who doesnt already possess your would be able to do so after reading those 800 words.

    What it will benefit is those who are looking for validation of their own theories, or help others recognize the crap that is published.

    If you are not looking for new biz, which posts like that would certainly help generate, then at least it provides a kind of baseline for those people to use when they consider hiring others.

    I hope you reconsider and rewrite it at some point in the future.