John Andrews is a Competitive Webmaster and Search Engine Optimization Consultant in Seattle, Washington. This is John Andrews blog on issues of interest to the SEO community and competitive webmasters. Want to know more?

johnon.com  Competitive Web & SEO
February 25th, 2008 by john andrews

Moniker Live Domain Auction at Affiliate Summit

Live ta th auction, finally got a WiFi connection. The energy levels are high, partly due to the energy of the Moniker guys. These guys are UP BEAT and doing a good job. The room has plenty of empty seats in the front 10 rows, but the back is full of “lurkers”. I suspect the affiliate participants are more curious than active in the auction, although I have no knowledge of actual paddle distribution.

Bombers.com is at $4000…. a bid in the room. $5k from the Internet,  topped at $5250 in the room. Now 57 1/2…. and I have no place to plug in my laptop. Looking for $6k but no interest, SOLD for $5750. Not a bad sale.

★★ Click to Share!    Digg this     Create a del.icio.us Bookmark     Add to Newsvine
February 23rd, 2008 by john andrews

Why You Should Care About Your Supreme Court Justices

For many of us “regular people” working in technology, the Supreme Court Justice appointment system is an obscure political process into which we have little input. However, as recent events demonstrate, the individuals assigned life long Supreme Court powers can have a tremendous impact on how our technology and our entrepreneurial activities play in the legal and civil world in which we live. Quite simply, as the following shows, the individuals appointed to the Supreme Court can personally decide whether your pioneering entrepreneurial activities are legal or illegal.

All you domainers, Internet marketers and web publishers should think about that. As you forge new rules as entrepreneurs, taking action first and expecting to sort it all out later, select individuals are making judgements that can make or break your financial status as well as your social status after the fact. Should you pay more careful attention to who gets elected, and who they want on the Supreme Court?

According to a recent release from E.P.I.C., the Supreme court ruled that police trusting their database/technology can arrest someone and pursue additional criminal evidence against them, even if the initial arrest was misguided because of something like a database error. Despite the initial mistake, new evidence found is admissible as evidence for new charges. Think about that. The “mistake” that got you interrogated is forgivable, and if they found anything using the capture/seize/interrogation powers they were granted by that error (powers they otherwise do not have, since you have Constitutional rights), you lose.

We all know how common errors are in the systems we build and use everyday, but did we know that something as serious as law enforcement is trusting those systems with our freedom at this very local level? Now enter the Supreme Court Justice once again, a few years later. When considering very similar situation more recently, the same Supreme Court Justice decided completely differently, citing a new (personal?) perspective on technology and its application. This time, the statement is (as reported by E.P.I.C.):

“In recent years, we have witnessed the advent of powerful, computer-based record keeping systems that facilitate arrests in ways that have never before been possible. The police, of course, are entitled to enjoy the substantial advantages this technology confers. They may not, however, rely on it blindly. With the benefits of more efficient law enforcement mechanisms comes the burden of corresponding constitutional responsibilities.”

So before, based on an individual’s perspective, the ruling was

…a man was searched, evidence was gathered against him, and he was arrested based on incorrect information in a government database..the police relied on an arrest warrant that had been rescinded five months before…Justice O’Connor “notes that the invocation of the good-faith exception…should depend on the reasonableness of the police officers’ reliance on the record keeping system itself…

and the evidence found was allowed. Now, that same case is being reconsidered because that opinion doesn’t seem to be in place today:

…Justice O’Connor also wrote, “In recent years, we have witnessed the advent of powerful, computer-based record keeping systems that facilitate arrests in ways that have never before been possible. The police, of course, are entitled to enjoy the substantial advantages this technology confers. They may not, however, rely on it blindly. With the benefits of more efficient law enforcement mechanisms comes the burden of corresponding constitutional responsibilities.”

Now I am not a lawyer, and I had to cut up alot of that to help it make sense here, including the legally-important fact that the first error was made by a court clerk and not a police officer, but it seems to me that the individuals on the Supreme Court have a tremendous amount of power interpreting the impact of complex technologies we build, and which our non-tech neighbors are deciding to deploy in our society every day. These are older people, by the way, not raised on technology and not likely to “get” much of what we type into our keyboards every day.

Something to think about?

★★ Click to Share!    Digg this     Create a del.icio.us Bookmark     Add to Newsvine
February 23rd, 2008 by john andrews

Wikileaks IP Address 178.33.255.46 (UPDATED below)

ORIGINAL: Just in case anyone was looking for Wikileaks.com, since their domain name was confiscated.

Updated: 07/2011 now 178.33.255.46 enjoy!
Updated 12/2010: was 88.80.13.160 now 88.80.2.32 now 213.251.145.96 see wikileaks.ch

Updated 07/2013: was 178.33.255.46 now… broken. Wikileaks moved from wikileaks.com to wikileaks.org and then moved to utilize the Cloudflare proxy system, in order to maintain uptime during sustained denial of service attacks.

The Cloudflare network blocks direct IP access, since it has to use DNS tools to manage the DOS attacks, which means published IPs of Cloudflare proxies for Wikileaks servers are useless.

Access wikileaks via http://Wikileaks.org when it is available. If that goes offline (for whatever reason) we will have to wait for news from wikileaks engineers, as they devise better ways to enable access. There is evidence from Wikilekas that they are re-engineering their access, to minimize dependency on factors that can be manipulated by those trying to block access.

★★ Click to Share!    Digg this     Create a del.icio.us Bookmark     Add to Newsvine

Competitive Webmaster

Wonder how to be more competitive at some aspect of the web? Submit your thoughts.

SEO Secret

Not Post Secret

Click HERE



about


John Andrews is a mobile web professional and competitive search engine optimzer (SEO). He's been quietly earning top rank for websites since 1997. About John

navigation

blogroll

categories

comments policy

archives

credits

Recent Posts: ★ Do you want to WIN, or just “Be the Winner”? ★ 503: GONE ★ Cloud Storage ★ Identity Poetry for Marketers ★ PR is where the Money Is ★ Google is an Addict ★ When there are no Jobs ★ Google Stifles Innovation, starts Strangling Itself ★ Flying the SEO Helicopter ★ Penguin 2.0 Forewarning Propaganda? ★ Dedicated Class “C” IP addresses for SEO ★ New Domain Extensions (gTLDs) Could Change Everything ★ Kapost Review ★ Aaron Von Frankenstein ★ 2013 is The Year of the Proxy ★ Preparing for the Google Apocalypse ★ Rank #1 in Google for Your Name (for a fee) ★ Pseudo-Random Thoughts on Search ★ Twitter, Facebook, Google Plus, or a Blog ★ The BlueGlass Conference Opportunity ★ Google Execs Take a Break from Marissa Mayer, Lend Her to Yahoo! ★ Google SEO Guidelines ★ Reasons your Post-Penguin Link Building Sucks ★ Painful Example of Google’s Capricious Do Not Care Attitude ★ Seeing the Trees, but Missing the Forest 

Subscribe

☆ about

John Andrews is a mobile web professional and competitive search engine optimzer (SEO). He's been quietly earning top rank for websites since 1997. About John

☆ navigation

  • John Andrews and Competitive Webmastering
  • E-mail Contact Form
  • What does Creativity have to do with SEO?
  • How to Kill Someone Else’s AdSense Account: 10 Steps
  • Invitation to Twitter Followers
  • …unrelated: another good movie “Clean” with Maggie Cheung
  • …unrelated: My Hundred Dollar Mouse
  • Competitive Thinking
  • Free SEO for NYPHP PHP Talk Members
  • Smart People
  • Disclosure Statement
  • Google Sponsored SPAM
  • Blog Post ideas
  • X-Cart SEO: How to SEO the X Cart Shopping Cart
  • IncrediBill.blogspot.com
  • the nastiest bloke in seo
  • Seattle Domainers Conference
  • Import large file into MySQL : use SOURCE command
  • Vanetine’s Day Gift Ideas: Chocolate Fragrance!
  • SEM Rush Keyword Research
  • ☆ blogroll

  • Bellingham SEO
  • Domain Name Consultant
  • Hans Cave Diving in Mexico
  • Healthcare Search Marketing
  • John Andrews
  • John Andrews SEO
  • SEMPDX Interview
  • SEO Quiz
  • SEO Trophy Phrases
  • SMX Search Marketing Expo
  • T.R.A.F.F.I.C. East 2007
  • TOR
  • ☆ categories

    Competition (39)
    Competitive Intelligence (15)
    Competitive Webmastering (546)
    Webmasters to Watch (4)
    domainers (63)
    Oprah (1)
    photography (3)
    Privacy (16)
    Public Relations (187)
    SEO (397)
    Client vs. SEO (2)
    Link Building (3)
    Search Engines vs. SEO (1)
    SEO SECRETS (11)
    SEO vs. SEO (1)
    ThreadWatch Watching (5)
    Silliness (24)
    Social Media (7)
    society (31)
    Uncategorized (23)

    ☆ archives

  • September 2014
  • December 2013
  • October 2013
  • September 2013
  • August 2013
  • May 2013
  • April 2013
  • March 2013
  • February 2013
  • January 2013
  • November 2012
  • September 2012
  • August 2012
  • July 2012
  • June 2012
  • April 2012
  • March 2012
  • February 2012
  • January 2012
  • November 2011
  • October 2011
  • September 2011
  • July 2011
  • May 2011
  • April 2011
  • March 2011
  • January 2011
  • December 2010
  • November 2010
  • October 2010
  • September 2010
  • August 2010
  • July 2010
  • June 2010
  • May 2010
  • April 2010
  • March 2010
  • February 2010
  • January 2010
  • December 2009
  • November 2009
  • October 2009
  • September 2009
  • August 2009
  • July 2009
  • June 2009
  • May 2009
  • April 2009
  • March 2009
  • February 2009
  • January 2009
  • December 2008
  • November 2008
  • October 2008
  • September 2008
  • August 2008
  • July 2008
  • June 2008
  • May 2008
  • April 2008
  • March 2008
  • February 2008
  • January 2008
  • December 2007
  • November 2007
  • October 2007
  • September 2007
  • August 2007
  • July 2007
  • June 2007
  • May 2007
  • April 2007
  • March 2007
  • February 2007
  • January 2007
  • December 2006
  • November 2006
  • October 2006
  • September 2006
  • August 2006
  • July 2006